Archive for the ‘illustration’ Category

New Painting of Shatrunjunya Hill at the V&A – Talk takes place on Karttika-Purnima

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

The V&A has recently acquired a large and splendid painting of Shatrunjaya Hill in Gujarat, one of the holiest Jain sites. Thousands of pilgrims climb up to the temples on top by a path with over 3,000 steps. Detailed paintings like this of the sacred site enable worshippers unable to be there to envisage and contemplate it.

Come and see the painting on karttika-purnima, the special day when these paintings are traditionally venerated, and learn about it. (more…)

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Jain Treasures display extended until 30th June

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

We are fortunate to have agreed an extension to the exhibition of the Jain treasures displayed in the John Ritblat Gallery: Treasures of the British Library. The free display is now on until the end of June, allowing you more time to look through the collection and more opportunities to have a tour of the display through JAINpedia volunteers. (more…)

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JAINpedia reception and launch of ‘Jain Tales’

Friday, March 18th, 2011

The Institute of Jainology (IoJ) in partnership with the British Library is holding a reception, guided tour and lecture at the British Library on 22nd March 2011. Our expert scholar Prof. Nalini Balbir will give a lecture on the importance and history of the collection of Jain treasures at the British Library. We look forward to seeing members from the Jain community, Jain schools, stakeholders of the JAINpedia project and various others at this event. As the display is only on until the end of June, this is a great opportunity to see the objects on display and learn more about them.

The IoJ recently published the book Jain Tales, with original artwork by Kamini Gupta, and text by Colin Hynson. The book has been designed for young readers, giving them an insight into the Jain religion, ethics and principles through stories that illustrate the Jain teachings. The launch of this book adds to the entry-level book, Discover Jainism, which is part of the English religious education curriculum.

We look forward to seeing more of you at the next event at the British Library on 15th April 2011. This event will be held to celebrate Mahavir Jayanti, a Jain festival celebrating the birth of Mahavira. Look out for more details of this FREE event!

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Jain treasures displayed at the British Library

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

On 8 October, the British Library launched JAINpedia in a stunning display in the Treasures Gallery running until the end of April 2011.

Consisting of around 40 striking objects from the library’s Jain collection, the display appears in the rotating Sacred Texts permanent exhibition in the Sir John Ritblat Gallery, also known as the Treasures Gallery of the British Library.

Mahāvīra’s incarnation as a god in the Puśpottara heaven
Mahāvīra’s incarnation as a god in the Puśpottara heaven
Kalpa-sūtra © The British Library Board

(more…)

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Words and paintings

Friday, October 23rd, 2009
I am Nalini Balbir, the content director of Jainpedia, the academic consultant who is in charge of ensuring that what’s on the website is accurate, comprehensive and intellectually credible. I’d like to give you an overview of how I began studying Jainism and talk briefly about why manuscripts are so central to Jainpedia.

As a professor of Indian studies at the Sorbonne, my academic interests include not only Jainism but Sanskrit, Pali, Prakrit, Theravada Buddhism, and Hindi languages and literature of the 20th century. Although I am fully involved with Jainpedia and have worked for some years with the Institute of Jainology and other institutions in the UK on Jain-related projects, my work in Jainism arose only towards the end of my undergraduate career. (more…)

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First images!

Thursday, October 8th, 2009

I’m very pleased to report that a few weeks ago we received nearly all of the digital images of the manuscripts we requested from the Wellcome Library.

You will be able to start appreciating the beauty of these artefacts in these small photos.

Manuscripts

A manuscript is made up of a number of folios. A folio is a sheet of paper or other material that has writing and sometimes an illustration on each side of the sheet. Each folio bears the handwriting of a scribe who used ink to write by hand. Many of the folios are also painted in full colour.

Kālakācāryakathā © Wellcome Library, London

Kālakācāryakathā © Wellcome Library, London

For most of the manuscripts we’ll be displaying on the forthcoming full Jainpedia website, each page (one side of the sheet) has been photographed. Sometimes a manuscript will consist of only one or two folios, because of its age, its material or the conditions in which it was kept before being held in a professional curated environment. (more…)

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